Results tagged ‘ interviews ’

What was he thinking?

Thumbnail image for Chacon.jpgThe Astros indefinitely suspended pitcher Shawn Chacon tonight.  Reports from the locker room say that General Manager Ed Wade asked Chacon to go to Manager Cecil Coopers office.  Chacon refused.  He has been upset over the possibility of being removed from the starting rotation to the bull pen.  He asked for a trade, and did not want to stay with the Astros if he couldn’t start.  According to Chacon, as told to the Houston Chronicle, Wade again asked him to Coopers office, and Chacon told Wade he could say whatever he wanted to say to him there in the players dining room.  According to Chacon, Wade began yelling and him and cursed at him, and Chacon lost it, grabbing Wade by the back of the neck and taking him to the ground and holding him there.  It took other players to pull him off.  Wade would not speak of the altercation afterward, only referring to it as an internal matter.  Chacon was escorted out of Minute Maid Park by security.

Anger management?  A little late for that.  Lots of people would like to be paid 2 million to sit in a bull pen.

Video Interview with Hunter Pence

Check out the latest mlb.com/kids interview with Hunter Pence! 

http://houston.astros.mlb.com/media/video.jsp?mid=200806092879409 or go to astros.com and check out the video in the top right corner.

Also, at www.mlb.com/kids you can see one on one interviews with Josh Beckett and Nolan Ryan.  Enjoy!

 

Michael

Boomer Don’t Go!

Boomer3a You have to admit, no matter what, David Wells brought something to baseball no other seemed to match – gumption.

After being released by the Padres, Wells, 44,Boomer2a  will have some difficult decisions to make over the next few days.

Every day I check the internet to see if he landed on another team, or decided to call it a day.

This search led me to a column by Tim Sullivan of the Union-Tribune in San Diego.  Mr. Sullivan spelled it out – time goes on, but look at what he’s done. I think at the very least he deserved to be recognized for his accomplishments in the game, and not just on recent performance. 

(http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/sullivan/20070809-9999-1s9sullivan.html)  It’s a great read btw.

I was only 6 years-old when Wells pitched his perfect game. How cool it would have been to be there.

Having spent most of his time in the AL while I was growing up, I never got to see him in person until two-weeks ago in Houston.  I was in complete awe. 

I have interviewed a lot of high profile major leaguers, and I was very excited when he was scheduled to pitch on this trip. I submitted my interview request and  I couldn’t wait to try and sit and talk with him.  Unfortunately, after the shaky outing, the interview didn’t happen.  I hope to get the opportunity to interview him one day, but of course, that would mean him not retiring, and then playing with a NL team that makes its rounds to Houston or close by. 

But don’t rule me out hoping on a plane if he signed with another team and the opportunity presented itself. (Right mom?  Hop on a plane? With a little – ok a lot – of nudging from me, who knows, she just might do it!  She’s one of Boomer’s biggest fans, and being a sports photographer, took about a million pictures of him when he was here. There will certainly be no shortage of David Wells photosBoomer4a  if anyone needs one. BTW, she taught me to love baseball early on, and I thank her for that. ) Boomer5a

If I could make the decision for Wells, I would say kick the mud off the shoes, saddle up and give it another go.  Go out your way – when you want – and show ‘em you still got game. 

But if he decides to retire, that’s ok too. He has nothing to hang his head over and we wish him the very best. 

Tom Glavine – Mr. 300!

Congratulations to Tom Glavine, Glavine_2 who became the 23rd pitcher to  win 300 games.  He has been a real role model to young players coming up and those who hope to one day be just like him.  When I interviewed Tom, I was struck by not only how nice he was, but that he really took our interview seriously, and gave me the time I needed.  Thanks Tom! 

Tell me the best thing about playing baseball.

Well,  it’s fun, and the competition  of trying to get hitters out , and trying to be successful is the best.

Did you play any other sports besides baseball as a kid?

I played a little bit of everything, mostly baseball and hockey, but a little bit of soccer and basketball.

When did you begin playing baseball?Tom_glavin

I started play when I was seven years old in Little League.

What stadiums do you like to play in best and why?

I like to play in three.  Wrigley Field, Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium.  They are so rich in tradition and the history of all the great players that have played there.

What kind of music do you like?

Just about everything .  I like to listen to a little bit of everything.

Have you had any jobs besides baseball?

I worked in construction a little bit when I was in High School with my dad.  But that was it.

How do you feel about the strike zone?

I always wish it was bigger.  Pitchers always think it’s too small and hitters always think it’s too big, but I think as long as it’s consistent then it’s something everyone can work with and you find a way to be successful.

Do you have any hobbies?

I like to play golf and play around with my kids.

What’s the most embarrassing moment you’ve ever had?

I think there was one time in my first or second year in the league and I went up to bat and forgot to take the donut off the bat. 

What is one thing you don’t travel without?

My computer.  I like getting on there and checking things out, and e-mailing my friends and my family and my kids and stuff like that.

Who do you think is the best player in MLB?

The best player in baseball right now is probably Barry Bonds.  He is such a great hitter and really impacts the game more than anybody right now.

How would you complete the following sentence:  The thing most people find interesting about me is …

My dedication and determination.

Who influenced you most in life?

My mom and dad.  They were very supportive of me playing sports and they provided me with great lessons for my life.

What is the one thing that bugs you:

Long baseball games. 

If you could change anything about yourself, what would it be?

Probably be a little bit more outgoing and goofier. 

Lightening Round with Atlanta Braves Chipper Jones

DH or No DH?Chipperjones

No DH

Night Game or Day Game?

Night game.

Simpsons or 60 minutes?

I’d say 60 minutes.

Leno or Letterman?

Letterman

Playstation or X Box?

Playstation

Sand or Snow?

Daytona – sand

Cadillac or pickup truck?

Pickup truck

Country or rock?

Country

Golf or tennis?

Golf

History or current events?

Current events

West Coast or East Coast?

East

Jumbo Jack or Big Mac?

Big Mac

City or country?

Country

Chasing 715 – Barry Bonds

Astros Manager Phil Garner said that sometimes when baseball players are at or near milestones it can really be hard to get over the top.  What are your thoughts about that?

It’s true, you know, it’s a lot more tension, a lot more everything.  But it’s also big for you as a person, as a player,Bonds_reflecting  as an accomplishment.  Sometimes it can be a little bit overwhelming. You’re like, wow, I can’t believe it.

How do you get it all done with such a swirl around you? 

It’s tough, because I just go home and sleep now.  Normally I go work out and train and everything else and now I’m just exhausted all the time, just tired, always tired.  I’ve never been like this before.  I just sleep all the time, all day.

Is this what you thought it was all cracked up to, to get this far in your career, and with all the stuff that has gone on, is it as much fun?

No, baseball’s fun.  Baseball’s great. Bonds_swinging  This is fun.  If you’re not having fun, don’t do it.  It’s tiring, but it’s still fun. 

Do you already look ahead to Hank Aaron, or can you not look that far?

I have to think of trying to get a hit.  Once I get that one, then I’ll work on the next thing.  I have to get one project out of the way first. (laughs).

How does this career chase compare to the single season chase?

It’s different.  The single season situation can only happen once.  This is like chasing two ghosts.  It’s like crazy.  I can imagine what Roger Maris went through and Babe Ruth just hovers over people a lot (laughs).

Have you had the chance to talk to Willie Mays much?

Every day. 

What does he say to you?

Quit screwing around.  What the @#@# is wrong with you? That’s it pretty much.

How many guys on this planet can talk to you like that?

Not many at all, except my mom.

What about these intentional walks.  Does it affect your focus any at all?

It’s harder when you get older.  And then with my knees being sore, you know, as innings go on I get tired and tireder and my leg gets tired, and that’s just reality but that’s not excuse.  You still have to go out there for your teammates and do your job so, regardless so…. It will funnel down to somebody else after I’m gone.

It must be incredibly frustrating though. 

I’ve been going through it, for I don’t know, ten years?  I am accustomed to it.  It’s just that you know, I haven’t been patient in the opportunities that I have had.  Swinging at a lot of pitches that I normally wouldn’t swing at.  Taking more changes than I ever have in my whole entire career.  Most of the time, I just wait.  Wait it out. But right now I just haven’t had that patience to wait it out. 

Steve Finley said this team has made people pay when they walk you because they score runs behind you. Bonds  

That is true.  We are scoring those runs.  Some teams are scoring more runs than we are in those opportunities (laughs).

Was it tough if you weren’t able to hit 714 at home?

Yeah, that was the most important thing for me.  San Francisco is my hugest supporting cast and the fans, and I have been able to do it for them ever since I’ve been here and there’s nothing more gratifying.  And if you want someone to catch a ball, you want it to be on your terms.  The way I’m swinging, it looks like I can wait.  (Laughs)

You’ve hit homeruns in this ballpark (Minute Maid). You like it in this park. 

It’s a good ballpark.  Our ballpark is a little tougher to hit home runs in.  But, I’ve been to a lot of the easier ones too and haven’t done much either, so…Right now it’s just getting a hit.  I’m going to work on that first.  I might start bunting to move the third baseman back to his normal position.

Getting to know: RYAN DEMPSTER – Video Interview

Ball players come in all shapes and sizes, personalities and skill levels.  Many also have hidden talents.  Such is the case with Chicago Cubs pitcher Ryan Dempster.  Not only is he an excellent pitcher, but it just so happens he does magic tricks and impersonations!  Click on the link below to see my video interview with Ryan.  He’ll have you in stitches!

Michael McHugh & Ryan Dempster

Q&A with Eric Gagne

ERIC GAGNE of the LOS ANGELES DODGERS –Gagne

MM:  You are one of the most dominate closers in baseball – how do you feel about that?

EG:  It’s kind of fun that you guys say that.  I just want to work out everyday and have fun with it.  Everytime I step on the field I have fun.  It’s great.

MM:  What’s your favorite pitch?

EG:  Change up.  I love my change up.  I think it’s a pretty good pitch and I like to keep everybody off balance but I like to throw fast balls and throw hard.

MM:  What’s the fastest ball you have thrown?

EG:  The fastest I’ve ever seen was 100 mph and that was in

Milwaukee

a few years ago.

MM:  What’s the first thing you bought with your big league paycheck?

I bought my mom a house.  My mom has always been there and always been supportive and I bought her a house and she was really happy.

MM:  What are your hobbies?

EG:  Golf, I play a lot of golf and I love watching hockey.  I can’t play the game anymore but I watch a lot of it. 

MM:  Name the one thing you don’t travel without.

EG:  My I Pod.  I have to have my music in my ears all the time. 

MM:  Tell me something in your that people don’t know about.

EG:  I’m not really aggressive, I’m really calm.  You don’t see that on the mound but I’m really a calm guy.

MM:  What’s the best advice anyone has every given you?

EG:  Jesse Orasco, by telling me it doesn’t matter what you did yesterday or the day before, you have to come down every day and be positive and have fun playing baseball, and if you don’t have fun playing baseball then you should go home.

Lightening Round:

DH or no DH –

No DH

Night game or day game –

Night Game

West coast/east coast –

West coast

National Geographic or Sports Illustrated

National Geographic

Reality or comedy

Comedy

Country or rap

Rap

Dog  or cats –

Dogs

Two Time World Series Champ Craig Counsell

                                       

Craig Counsell Counsell is an all around good guy. A two time World Series Champion, he’s the kind of guy kid’s look up to. Just ask my older brother Zach.  When Zach was nine, he thought Craig was the best player in the world and wrote to him all the time.  At that time, Craig was with the Florida Marlins.  The Marlins had just won the 1997 World Series, and Craig was a hero in South Florida.  My mom would take Zach to the Marlins games when they came to Houston.  They met by chance at a game, and after that they became friends. One year,  Zach was invited to the Marlins spring training camp in Viera, Florida, and hung out with Craig for the day.  We got to go on the trip with Zach, and it was pretty exciting, but of course to Zach, it was the best day ever.

  Craig was traded from the Marlins to the Dodgers and then to Diamondbacks, before landing in Milwaukee, his hometown, two years ago. Last season, he was traded back to the Diamondbacks and is very happy.

To this day, Zach and Craig still see each other every time he comes to town, and they stay in touch.  Zach is 15 now and their friendship has continued.  To me, that is what makes a champion.  Not just winning the World Series or a big game, but knowing you have influenced a kid along the way, and been a good role model and friend.

MM:  Is there a big difference between playing in Arizona and Milwaukee?

CC:  Not too different.  It’s still major league baseball, and you meet different guys and make new friends, and other than that, it’s about the same.

MM:  What was it like going back and playing in Milwaukee, the town you grew up in?

CC: Well it was pretty cool for any kid who grew up wanting to play major league baseball.  To be able to play in the town that you grew up was a great opportunity.

MM:  Did you have a favorite place to play between Arizona and Florida?

CC:  With both the Diamondbacks and the Marlins, we won the World Series, so both those were a lot of fun.  It’s tough to top that.

MM:  Do you feel there is a great responsibility being a role model?

CC:  I think it is a responsibility, but if you are a good person and you try to live your life as a good person, then everybody’s a role model.  That’s how I think of it.

MM:  What would you have done for a job if you weren’t a baseball player?

CC:  That’s a good question.  I’m not sure.  I haven’t had to find out yet.  I went to college and have a degree in accounting, so maybe something like that.

MM:  What do you consider as your greatest strength as a player?

CC:  Probably defense.  I can play a bunch of positions so probably just kind of being versatile for the manager to be able to go to a couple different positions.

MM:  Have things changed for you now that you’re a dad?

CC:  It’s changed quite a bit.  It’s a great thrill and it’s wonderful, and it changes your perspective in what things you consider important.  I love it every day being a father.

MM:  Who would you consider to be your biggest fan?

CC:  (laughs) That’s a loaded question.  I can’t say one person, but I have a lot of great fans, and their support is great and I’m glad they enjoy watching me.

MM:  If you were stuck on an island, which of these things would you want with you. A good book, a good movie or a good CD?

CC:  I’d probably have a good book.  It would last longer.

MM:  What book?

CC:  I’d take a long one.

MM:  What is one thing in your locker that would shock people to know?

CC:  I don’t have anything crazy in there.  Just the normal stuff.

MM:  What is the last good book that you read?

CC:  The Da Vinci Code.

MM:  Best movie?

CC:  Lost in Translation.  I like Bill Murray.  He’s funny.

MM:  Who influenced you most in life and why.

CC:  My parents, for sure.  They’re the ultimate role models, so my parents were the biggest influence. 

Cardiac Stros Do It Again

“Wild” about the Astros

Another regular season is over, but the Houston Astros are far from packing up their equipment. With a dramatic finish on Sunday before 42,288 screaming fans, the Stros won their second Wild Card title in a row. 

This one was a nail bitter.  Astros_wild_card_club_house2_oct05_045 The Cubs weren’t going down without a fight, and the Astros were not about to give up.  The last thing they wanted to do was board a plane to Philly for a playoff.  Nope.  They wanted to win this one at home.  They needed to win this one at home.

“I’m happy for the fans,” said Roger Clemens.  “We get to go to the dance one more time.”

“It’s not about making the playoffs,” added catcher Brad Ausmus.  “It’s about making it to the World Series.”

While all eyes were carefully checking out the scoreboard for the Phillies/Nationals game, the Astros had to keep their head in their game.  The fans were very aware of what was happening, and frantically cheered their team on with every play. 

Roy Oswalt pitched an outstanding game, earning his 20th win of the season.  "To get 20 is great, but to get to the playoffs is more," said Oswalt. "We’ve come a long way, especially the way the team pulled together and started playing."

With the last out recorded, the crowd was on their feet as a sea of red confetti Astros_wild_card_club_house2_oct05_166 fell from the rafters.  They got what they came for.  A win and wild card championship.

“I want to win a World Series Championship.  That’s why I’m here- to help this team win,” said pitcher Andy Pettitte.

For one Astro, making the playoffs meant something special.  Jeff Bagwell, who missed most of the season after having shoulder surgery, was thrilled at the opportunity to make one more run for a ring.

“It’s’ great,” he said. “It’s what we’ve been trying to do all season long,.  It’s our final way to get back in to the playoffs, and our guys did it.  That’s what we play for, the opportunity.”

Jeff is also grateful to the fans who stuck by the team and came to watch them play.

“ You guys (the fans) have been great all year.   The last 15 years of my career have been great, and the city keeps getting better and better and I appreciate it.”

Lance Berkman reminded us that “There’s still work to be done.”  He’s right.

The team now has to concentrate on the upcoming week where they will face the Braves in Atlanta on Wednesday with a 4 pm ET start,  and again in Atlanta on Thursday, 8 pm ET.  Friday will be an off day, with the Astros hosting the Braves at Minute Maid Park Saturday and Sunday, times to be announced.  If a fifth game is needed, it will be played in Atlanta Monday. 

Play off games are always exciting, and this one was no exception.  It’s a thrill to get in the mix of the game, following every pitch, every swing, every play with total concentration and excitement.  The Astros delivered, and now it’s on to the dance and a possible World Series Championship.